55 Strong: In Conclusion

We all remember our favorite teachers. We tuck their small acts of kindness  away in basements or in attic boxes: red-penned lines of encouragement, our worth acknowledged. We remember their handwriting and the wooden, waxy smell of their classrooms. Many of us continue to do good work in their names, and this is especially true of individuals who later became teachers themselves.

2018-07-18T08:58:35+00:00 July 16th, 2018|

In Appalachia, shifting political winds have forced Republican lawmakers to expand Medicaid. Could this be the start of a trend?

Mary White had noticed her knee hurting on and off for a while before she blew it out last October. “I turned around to go down the steps after I locked the door, and it kicked out the side and tore that ligament in there,” she said. White, who turns 64 in August, does not have health insurance. Her husband is on Social Security and Medicare, and between that and her slightly better-than-minimum-wage income at the Binns-Counts Community Center in Clinchco, Virginia, White doesn’t quite qualify for Medicaid.

2018-07-18T08:58:43+00:00 July 16th, 2018|

Dispatches From A Superlative Midwestern City

Milwaukee has become a clickbait darling. Our local media outlets run a story every time we're recognized as a "best-kept secret" or a "worst place to live." Without fail, my neighbors light up on Facebook in response to each one, sharing the latest listicle as they either swell with pride ("yeah, we are a hidden gem!") or struggle to articulate dissent with whoever most recently announced that we live in one of the country's most dangerous cities.

2018-07-16T09:52:45+00:00 July 13th, 2018|