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  • Two books and a t-shirt! Receive a Cleveland city seal t-shirt, and copies of  Rust Belt Chic: The Cleveland Anthology,  and The Cleveland Neighborhood Guidebook A perfect gift for your favorite Cleveland expat, new arrival, or city booster. This Cleveland city seal displays has a groovy 1970s design (and, although a seal, is still part of our City Flag T-shirt series). This dark grey with orange tee is a short sleeve crewneck from Next Level Apparel, 100% combed ring-spun cotton – soft, comfy, and lightweight. Comes in L & XL. Only a limited number of t-shirts will be available.
  • This Cleveland city seal displays has a groovy 1970s design (and, although a seal, is still part of our City Flag T-shirt series). This dark grey with orange tee is a short sleeve crewneck from Next Level Apparel, 100% combed ring-spun cotton – soft, comfy, and lightweight. Comes in L & XL. Only a limited number of t-shirts will be available. Pairs nicely with The Cleveland Bundle, which includes copies of Rust Belt Chic: The Cleveland Anthology and the The Cleveland Neighborhood Guidebook.  
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    The Buffalo city flag displays the harbor, has 13 lightning flashes to symbolize New York being one of the original colonies, and honors Buffalo's role in electrifying the nation. It was designed in 1924 by architect Louis Greenstein. T-shirt is a periwinkle blue short sleeve crewneck t-shirt from Next Level Apparel, 100% combed ring-spun cotton–soft, comfy and lightweight. Comes in S, L Pairs nicely with Right Here, Right Now: The Buffalo Anthology
  • The colors won't surprise you, but the symbols might: the city of Pittsburgh was named in 1758 by General John Forbes to honor Sir William Pitt, the British statesmen. Pitt was the first Earl of Chatham, so the flag is based on the Chatham Family coat of arms.   T-shirt is a short sleeve crewneck t-shirt from Next Level Apparel, 100% combed ring-spun cotton–soft, comfy and lightweight. Comes in S, M, L, XL Pairs nicely with The Pittsburgh Anthology and The Whiskey Rebellion and the Rebirth of Rye: A Pittsburgh Story. 
  • Toledo's flag may be the Rust Belt's finest, marrying manufacturing and water: it shows a silhouette of Fort Industry at sunrise behind the Maumee River. T-shirt is a periwinkle blue short sleeve crewneck t-shirt from Next Level Apparel, 100% combed ring-spun cotton -- soft, comfy and lightweight. Comes in S, M, L, XL Pairs nicely with In The Watershed: A Journey Down the Maumee River
  • Iconic Chicago artist Tony Fitzpatrick designed the beautiful cover of Rust Belt Chicago: An Anthology, and created this  poster of it. Printed on heavy stock, the posters measure 14"x18" Signed posters are available here.
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      Iconic Chicago artist Tony Fitzpatrick designed the beautiful cover of Rust Belt Chicago: An Anthology, and created a limited edition series of 50 signed 14" x 18" posters of the cover. Printed on heavy stock, proceeds from these posters will be donated to Open Books, a Chicago non-profit dedicated to literacy and the power of books. Unsigned posters are available here.
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    Edited by Dani Villela and Ashley Nickels Belt Publishing November 1 2017 While Grand Rapids is known for large-scale events like ArtPrize; major businesses like Meijer, Steelcase, and Amway and the philanthropic and political contributions of its wealthiest residents, there are hundreds — if not thousands — of grassroots activists working day-in and day-out to make Grand Rapids what it is and making it what it can be. This project seeks to raise the voices of those individuals and grassroots groups. Ashley E. Nickels and Dani Vilella have joined forces to compile articles, poetry, and personal narratives about and by Grand Rapids, Michigan’s grassroots activists. Grand Rapids Grassroots: An Anthology is the next book in Belt Publishing’s series of city-based anthologies. Read more here.
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    pre-order by October 15 and we will include a free cocktail recipe booklet!  By Mark Meyer and Meredith Meyer Grelli November 15, 2017 The Whiskey Rebellion and the Rebirth of Rye takes readers on a tour of the spirit's founding, floundering, and current flourishing. Authors Mark Meyer and Meredith Meyer Grelli explore rye whiskey's revolutionary origins in Western Pennsylvania, the role of Gilded Age robber barons in developing the rye industry and the reemergence of craft distilling in the twenty-first century. Featuring an illustrated guide on how to make rye whiskey and delicious cocktail recipes, this short book makes a compelling case that American whiskey's rightful home is Pittsburgh. Mark Meyer and Meredith Meyer Grelli are co-founders of Wigle Whiskey, a family owned and operated craft distillery based in Pittsburgh's Strip District. _____ For media and publicity inquiries, contact Dan Crissman at dan@beltmag.com.
  • February 6, 2018
    You couldn't kill this book with a hammer.  Come and watch Elizabeth Catte clip the hollow wings of little jimmy vance.  Stay and behold an enlightened vision, a living solidarity found among the strong and varied peoples of this misunderstood land.  What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia asks Florence Reece's old question: Which side are you on?  Some of us are sticking to Appalachia until every battle's won.  --Glenn Taylor, author of The Ballad of Trenchmouth Taggart  
    In 2016 headlines declared Appalachia ground zero for America’s “forgotten tribe” of white working class voters. Journalists flocked to the region to extract sympathetic profiles of families devastated by poverty, abandoned by establishment politics, and eager to consume cheap campaign promises. Following the election, demystifying Appalachia and locating the roots of its dysfunction quickly became a national industry, shoring up the success of J.D. Vance’s memoir Hillbilly Elegy and the author’s rise to fame as the media’s favorite working-class whisperer with broad appeal to liberals and conservatives alike. Personal anecdotes that demonstrated the enduring failures of American progress spoken through the mouthpiece of colorful and bereaved mountain folk became its own genre of election writing – the “Trump Country” piece – and in its creation reduced the region’s rich and complex history to a series of character studies. What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia is a frank assessment of America’s recent fascination with the people and problems of the region. The book analyzes trends in contemporary writing on Appalachia, presents a brief history of Appalachia with an eye toward unpacking Appalachian stereotypes, and provides examples of writing, art, and policy created by Appalachians as opposed to for Appalachians. The book offers a must-needed insider’s perspective on the region. Praise for What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia: "What are we getting wrong about Appalachia? A lot. And we are not just getting it wrong because we do not know. We are getting it wrong because reckoning with the reality of the Appalachia people and culture serves a historical project of disdain, distancing, and deliberate disinvestment in our nation. Elizabeth Catte has written an essential guide on how to talk about race, class, gender and the cultural geographies that shape our lives. Our discourse on Appalachia has been used a cudgel, much of it designed to obscure more than it reveals. Catte uses data and lived experiences to reveal an Appalachia that is not some 'othered' out there against which we compare ourselves to make inequality more palatable. This is a necessary antidote to the cyclical mainstream interest in Appalachia as a backwards, white working class caricature." --Tressie McMillan Cottom, author of Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy "A necessary response to the bigotry against a much-maligned culture." --Chris Offutt, author of Kentucky Straight "A bold refusal to submit to stereotype." --Kirkus Reviews Elizabeth Catte is a writer and historian from East Tennessee. She holds a PhD in public history from Middle Tennessee State University and is the co-owner of Passel, a historical consulting and development company. For media requests, please contact Michelle Blankenship at michelle@blankenshippr.com.
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    By Ryan Schnurr Publishing October 15, 2017 now shipping! The Maumee River Basin is the largest watershed in the Great Lakes region, collecting runoff from more than 6,600 square miles in Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan and depositing it in Lake Erie—though as the lake’s largest tributary the river's influence is not entirely positive. In this lively, ruminative book, Ryan Schnurr takes us on a journey down the Maumee River, walking and canoeing it from headwaters to mouth. Along the way, he traces the history, ecology, and culture of the river, from the influence of glaciers, through its role in Native American and American history, to its relevance for contemporary environmental issues. Part cultural history, part nature writing, part personal narrative, In the Watershed is a lyrical work of nonfiction in the vein of John McPhee and Ian Frazier with a timely and important warning at the core. "What is happening in Lake Erie," Schnurr tells us, "is a disaster by nearly any measure—ecologically, economically, socially, culturally." Advance praise for In the Watershed: "I am entranced by this slender, luminous volume. Ryan Schnurr has created a subtle monument to a place that we overlook, yet glows with sacredness under his measured gaze. Delightful." — Luis Alberto Urrea, author of The Devil's Highway and Into the Beautiful North "The land surface of Earth is a quilt of watersheds, each one gathering runoff that reveals what humans have been doing in the catchment area. All the poisons we spray or dump on the ground, all the soils we expose to erosion, eventually wind up in creeks and rivers, lakes and oceans. Every watershed needs observers who monitor its health, who care about the quality of wild and human life it supports. The Maumee Valley now has a new and keen-eyed caretaker in Ryan Schnurr, who has written an engaging narrative about a journey downriver from the headwaters to Lake Erie, braiding together his personal observations with history, science, and folklore." — Scott Russell Sanders, author of Earth Works: Selected Essays and A Conservationist Manifesto "Ryan Schnurr is a keeper of the spirit of John McPhee, Edward Abbey, and Annie Dillard — he writes about nature intimately and with a sense of wonder, but he's forever alert to the ways our environment is wounded and reshaped by our greed and neglect. The Maumee River may be relatively small and unknown, but reading this book it'll feel as big and important as the Mississippi: In the Watershed stretches from the glaciers of eons past to this year's algae blooms, from wars with Native Americans to Midwest industrial history. It's a rich, complex, and fragile place, and Schnurr is a superb guide through it." — Mark Athitakis, author of The New Midwest: A Guide to Contemporary Fiction of the Great Lakes, Great Plains, and Rust Belt Click here for more information.  
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    free shipping through September 4! Edited by Aaron Foley   Detroiters need to get to know their neighbors better. Wait — maybe that should be, Detroiters should get to know their neighborhoods better. It seems like everybody thinks they know the neighborhoods, but because there are so many, the definitions become too broad, the characteristics become muddled, the stories become lost. Edited by Aaron Foley, the Detroit Neighborhood Guidebook contains essays by Zoe Villegas, Drew Philip, Hakeem Weatherspoon, Marsha Music, Ian Thibodeau, and dozens others. See the Table of Contents here. Order by August 21 and receive a bonus hand-drawn map of Detroit with your book!